Grazia Endometriosis Awareness Article

Last Monday I was commissioned to write an article really close to my heart, a story for Grazia magazine about the endometriosis and adenomyosis battle I’ve endured.

The next day, I met with local Northumberland photographer Claire Batey of Unscripted Photography and took part in a photo shoot for the Grazia endometriosis piece.

Something which has been an ongoing challenge throughout my entire adult life, endometriosis first reared its ugly head at the age of 14. It took almost a decade to get a diagnosis, which is sadly not uncommon with endometriosis.

A disease without any known cure, I’ve undergone several operations and multiple hormone treatments. By December 2015, life was completely unbearable and I had to make the hardest decision of all. Choosing a hysterectomy, I am acutely aware this option isn’t a cure for endometriosis and is definitely not right for everyone.

Although not completely pain-free two years later, I am stoic about the dramatic difference this operation has had. Frankly, if the current level of pain and occasional niggles are my lot, I can deal with that, compared to the zombie state I occupied previously.

Endometriosis affects every aspect of a person’s life; from relationships to finances, friendships, mental health and more. The countless hospital admissions take as much of an emotional toll as the physical trauma brings.

I am so lucky to have the two little ones I always wanted, despite being told this may never happen. Endometriosis causes difficulty conceiving, chronic pain, and fatigue, amongst other intensely debilitating symptoms.

Really hoping to raise awareness, I have been nervous about sharing this part of me. However, if my words can help others in a similarly excruciating position, it will be more than worth it.

Out in this week’s issue, you can buy a copy  now or click here to read my Grazia endometriosis article. I’d love to hear your thoughts, and if you too suffer from this painful condition, feel free to get in touch and chat.


  1. Rachel Bowen March 4, 2018 / 8:49 pm

    My life was blighted by undiagnosed endometriosis- heavy periods, pain, frequent kidney infections. Despite numerous trips to doctors it was not finally diagnosed until I failed to conceive – I was 33. For the next few years having a baby was our focus. On my first round of IVF my consultant drained a huge chocolate cyst from my ovary. Although successful my first pregnancy ended in a miscarriage at 14 weeks. Eventually at 37 I gave birth to twin girls – while stitching me up after the caesarean I remember my consultant showing and describing to the other doctors and nurses my scarred, tangled reproductive organs!

    I am so lucky to have our beautiful daughters. But childbirth did not cure my endometriosis; I continued to suffer from heavy periods, pains – I am pretty suffer I had it on my lungs as during my periods I suffered chest pain. – and kidney infections. I discussed a hysterectomy with my GP. Luckily I entered the menopause in my mid forties and my periods stopped quickly. My health improved almost immediately.

    Our daughters are now 19 and I watch for symptoms in them. Remembering talks with my paternal grandmother I am pretty certain that both she and my great grandmother suffered from the same condition.

    Well done for bringing this debilitating condition to the fore – diagnoses need to be made far earlier and this can only be done by raising the profile.

    • helenwilsonbeevers March 5, 2018 / 10:18 am

      Hi Rachel, thank you so much for reading and for the comment- I’m so sorry you suffered so much, it’s such a debilitating and traumatic condition. I’m also extremely glad that your health improved, it must have been a huge relief. My daughter is only 8 and I’m already aware and concerned it could affect her. I hope none of our daughters get it. My maternal grandmother had endo too. Thank you again, and very best wishes to you xxx

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